Need to replace Brake Pads

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Need to replace Brake Pads

This is a discussion on Need to replace Brake Pads within the Veloster Turbo Australia forums, part of the Veloster Turbo World Forums category; Hey guys i can do most things on my car however im a newbie when it comes to brakes now i need new brake pads ...

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Thread: Need to replace Brake Pads

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    OzzyDee's Avatar
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    Need to replace Brake Pads

    Hey guys i can do most things on my car however im a newbie when it comes to brakes


    now i need new brake pads cause mine are starting to skretch.

    what do i need to look at for replacements, anything specific for our V's ?

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    Disc brake pads are EASY compared to the old days with drums... My previous car, a friend helped and when it came time to the back brakes, he was telling me, "Now, okay, becareful of the spring because...." and SPROING! There went the spring. We spent more time looking for that damn thing than we did with the brakes!

    Today, it's been several years but I think other than normal tools (screwdriver, band-aids, and beer, lots of beer), about the only thing you need is a vice clamp so that you can depress the caliper to relieve the pressure on the pad. Pop it out, put the new one on and take off the clamp. No bleeding of the brake lines, no springs shooting off to the other side of the yard, etc.

    Disclaimer: This is a memory from several years back and may be distorted due to getting older and/or the consumption of many adult beverages during the brake changing process and since then. The procedures may have changed since then; along with my underwear (a few times, at least), the weather, and my mind.
    OzzyDee and 2mtech like this.
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    Ricky-D's Avatar
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    Yes, the rear brakes are more complex due to the mechanical emergency brake system.

    It's very important to use the manual for the rear brake pad exchange.

    The front brakes are not so tricky.

    Keep in mind that when you compress the caliper pistons, you are in

    effect, pumping all/any trash that accumulated in the caliper back

    into the line and possibly back as far as the master cylinder.

    ***

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    If you put new pads on worn, scoured rotors, the scouring will rip the new pads to pieces in no time. So to get your money's worth the rotors should be machined to remove any scouring, assuming that this doesn't take the rotor to less than minimum thickness. Mostly it does, so these days new pads usually means new pads and new rotors.

    Because of the ESP you should only fit stock brake pads.

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    Changing disc brake pads is pretty straightforward as long as you have a good jack, and the generic spreader tool.

    The thinking on the rotors has changed over the years. It used to be that rotors were expensive and every shop had a special lathe to cut or resurface them and the rotors could be cut several times before they had to be replaced. These days very few shops have that rotor lathe and new rotors come pre-cut and cost a lost less. So now replacing the rotors is kind of standard.

    However, if you replace the pads well before they wear out and the rotors look OK I think it's OK to just replace the pads.

    But in your case you're hearing the wear indicator noise, so you need to address your rotors. You have 2 choices, either cut your rotors or replace them. If you're doing the brake job yourself you need to be able to take your rotors to a shop that can cut them. This means having your car down while this is being done and having a second car to drive the rotors back and forth to the rare shop that can cut them. Or you can order fresh rotors and do the complete brake job in one pass. If you are new to working on cars I would just order new rotors and replace them too. It's more fun that way and it gives you the confidence that everything is correct.

    Then there is the brake fluid thing. IMHO, the last thing you want to do is mess with the brake fluid or bleed the system unless you absolutely have to do that. New cars can go through 4+ brake jobs with the master cylinder and slave cylinders in the calipers working fine and requiring no brake fluid maintenance. The previous poster mentioned the danger of pushing dirt and debris back in to the system when spreading the calipers. That is true but the system is just that little piece of hydraulic brake line. If you've got a Porsche, Ferrari or even an STi or EVO - yeah you probably want to purge the whole system every time with racing grade hydraulic fluid. That's a very expensive pain that can also damage your brake cylinders by making them run dry at first.

    If the fluid in your brake reservoir looks good, your brake pedal feels sharp and the calipers spread smoothly using that special tool, I would not mess with the brake fluid or bleeding the brakes at all.

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    WildHareMS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ricky-D View Post
    Yes, the rear brakes are more complex due to the mechanical emergency brake system.

    It's very important to use the manual for the rear brake pad exchange.

    The front brakes are not so tricky.

    Keep in mind that when you compress the caliper pistons, you are in

    effect, pumping all/any trash that accumulated in the caliper back

    into the line and possibly back as far as the master cylinder.


    ***
    Okay...this is actually pretty close to BS

    Quote Originally Posted by Stone Axe View Post
    Then there is the brake fluid thing. IMHO, the last thing you want to do is mess with the brake fluid or bleed the system unless you absolutely have to do that. New cars can go through 4+ brake jobs with the master cylinder and slave cylinders in the calipers working fine and requiring no brake fluid maintenance. The previous poster mentioned the danger of pushing dirt and debris back in to the system when spreading the calipers. That is true but the system is just that little piece of hydraulic brake line. If you've got a Porsche, Ferrari or even an STi or EVO - yeah you probably want to purge the whole system every time with racing grade hydraulic fluid. That's a very expensive pain that can also damage your brake cylinders by making them run dry at first.

    If the fluid in your brake reservoir looks good, your brake pedal feels sharp and the calipers spread smoothly using that special tool, I would not mess with the brake fluid or bleeding the brakes at all.
    Then it gets passed on again.... STOP, please.

    Unless you have a torn/broken/missing/loose caliper piston dust boot AND a bad seal around your caliper piston this will NOT HAPPEN. And if those two things are indeed present, you're losing brake fluid anyways.

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    Ozzy dude... stick to oem stuff.... unless you can afford a little more for something like ebc or something
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    mate be honest im happy with oem i just wanted to know if theres something better thats affordable my cousin was telling me hes going to get me brake pads so i wanted to know is there specific brands and makes for the v, that were able to use

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    The VT is so new that the stock pads are probably the only ones available. Given how well the stock VT brakes work the stock pads are fine.

    If you are hearing the screech than your rotors might be compromised.

    All brake pads have a layer of material that make a screeching sound so you know to replace them before they wear out. But that means your rotors might be getting dogged out too.

    If you are a new enthusiast, I highly recommend doing a brake job yourself as a good introduction to working on cars. It's a dirty job but it's a good job. If you have any doubts you should definitely replace the rotors at the same time. Brake jobs are fun and very satisfying - and a fresh set of rotors lets you stomp on the VT's brakes all that much harder.

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    Ok, just in case the OP decides to handle doing their own brakes.....simple steps after install to make sure they're bedded in properly so you can enjoy them sooner. Yes, this means do not make your first stop from 100mph to zero!!

    Once you have the brake pads (and or rotors) installed and are ready to drive.... Get the car up to 35mph and gently slow the car to 5mph, but do not come to a stop. Then get back up to 35mph and do the same step again. I recommend these two steps be completed at a minimum before actually making and full stops. If you like, you can continue the 35-5mph slow downs a couple more time with increased pedal pressure just to be sure they're properly seated. After you've made at least two 35-5mph decels, you can do a 35/40-0 stop with moderate braking force. Then....enjoy your new brakes. Typical recommendation would still be to take it easy in them for the first 500miles or so...but if you've bedded the pads properly, you don't have to take it easy for that long.

    If you chose to do anything close to a race pad for some reason, let us know so we can tell you how to properly bed those in if they don't come with instructions.

    Have fun & good luck!

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