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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So as this is my first post with the community, and as a new owner of a 2016 VT, I figured I'd use this as an introduction as well. I'm not a super big car guy (my knowledge is pretty much limited to I can replace a part provided that I'm told what the part is), but I've had my eyes on a 2016 VT for a few years, and I finally hit a point in my life where I was financially stable enough to get my hands on one. With that being said, I don't want to leave it stock, but I also don't want to blindly throw money at parts in which I may not even need. Anyone got suggestions for the first few things I should do to it?
 

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There's a stickied thread somewhere about what mods to do in which order. The jist of it is: Tires. Turbo resonator delete. Rigid collars. Intake. Exhaust. Lowering springs/coilovers. Usually in that order and up to whatever power target you're shooting for.

I believe the biggest tire size you can put on the stock wheels is 245 40 r18 without rubbing. Should give you plenty of traction in the summer/on the track

The resonator delete is very straightforward and is one of the best bang for your buck mods you can perform. Highly recommend.

Rigid collars are pretty simple to install provided you can get under the car. Just remove bolts and put the collar in.

Intake and exhaust improve the sound more than they improve the performance. They come into their own when you get it tuned, however.

Lowering springs really make the car come alive in the corners. Coupled with good tires and the rigid collars the car feels like it's on rails. The stock dampers should be able to get you through most street driving and the occasional autocross day. if you're planning on taking it to the track regularly, you may want to invest in coilovers instead of lowering springs to get the added adjustments.
 

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Proper maintenanceand using 91+ octane fuel is most important which few do. Mod wise the end goals and use of the car will determine that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Proper maintenanceand using 91+ octane fuel is most important which few do. Mod wise the end goals and use of the car will determine that.
The car came with a complete service history and it was very well taken care of prior to my ownership. I do have a question regarding the 91+ octane fuel though. One of the first things I did was thumb through the owner's manual and it said that using anything with a pump octane rating of 87 or higher was the be used, is there a reason you're saying 91+? Car is intended to be regularly driven but I'm just looking for a little more "oomph" (as I like to put it) than stock. I don't have much intention of using it as a track car or anything, I just want it be something I really enjoy driving while still being able to use it as a commute car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There's a stickied thread somewhere about what mods to do in which order. The jist of it is: Tires. Turbo resonator delete. Rigid collars. Intake. Exhaust. Lowering springs/coilovers. Usually in that order and up to whatever power target you're shooting for.

I believe the biggest tire size you can put on the stock wheels is 245 40 r18 without rubbing. Should give you plenty of traction in the summer/on the track

The resonator delete is very straightforward and is one of the best bang for your buck mods you can perform. Highly recommend.

Rigid collars are pretty simple to install provided you can get under the car. Just remove bolts and put the collar in.

Intake and exhaust improve the sound more than they improve the performance. They come into their own when you get it tuned, however.

Lowering springs really make the car come alive in the corners. Coupled with good tires and the rigid collars the car feels like it's on rails. The stock dampers should be able to get you through most street driving and the occasional autocross day. if you're planning on taking it to the track regularly, you may want to invest in coilovers instead of lowering springs to get the added adjustments.
I did end up taking a look at the stickied thread you linked, I can't believe I'd missed that. I tried to do a fair bit of research myself but I also wanted input on my specific situation as I'm not the most knowledge by any stretch when it comes to modifying cars. My only question about doing a resonator delete is the legality behind it. As someone who lives in the Southeast Texas region, I want to keep my car street legal and I'm not sure if a resonator delete would help me meet that end.
 

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I did end up taking a look at the stickied thread you linked, I can't believe I'd missed that. I tried to do a fair bit of research myself but I also wanted input on my specific situation as I'm not the most knowledge by any stretch when it comes to modifying cars. My only question about doing a resonator delete is the legality behind it. As someone who lives in the Southeast Texas region, I want to keep my car street legal and I'm not sure if a resonator delete would help me meet that end.
The resonator on the turbo piping is purely there to reduce the whoosh and whistle sounds the turbo makes. It doesn't affect emissions, so more than likely it's completely legal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The resonator on the turbo piping is purely there to reduce the whoosh and whistle sounds the turbo makes. It doesn't affect emissions, so more than likely it's completely legal.
Sounds like the best place to start, you mind me picking your brain about the differences between a SRI & CAI? Recommendations on which to go with and pros/cons of each?
 

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sure!
So, the SRI is designed to reduce turbo lag by shortening the pipe length from filter to compressor inlet. With the positioning of the turbo on this car, a true SRI isn't really possible without putting the intake directly behind the engine. The offering you'll see from K&N, Injen, and a few others are only slightly shorter than the factory airbox. They do offer both louder sound and the ability to run pod filters though, and will provide better flow overall.

I'm only aware of one CAI for this platform, and that's the AEM intake. It places the filter behind the left hand foglight, as far as possible from the engine. This extends the intake piping, but reduces the temperature of the air coming through. This can give you more power, and give the factory intercooler a bit of a break. In my opinion, by the time the air has made it from the front of the car to the turbo behind the engine, gone through the hot-ass turbo, gone under the car next to the oil, and then hit the intercooler, the difference is going to be minimal if anything.

I'm personally running the K&N typhoon intake, and it makes good choo-choo sounds. To be honest though, unless you plan on tuning it it's largely just a sound upgrade. The factory intake with a good panel filter will get you all the power you need for a minimal tune or just stock driving with bolt-ons. I'd ask @TRDTroy about the headroom required for tuning, as well as his opinion on this as well. He's incredibly knowledgable
 

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The car came with a complete service history and it was very well taken care of prior to my ownership. I do have a question regarding the 91+ octane fuel though. One of the first things I did was thumb through the owner's manual and it said that using anything with a pump octane rating of 87 or higher was the be used, is there a reason you're saying 91+? Car is intended to be regularly driven but I'm just looking for a little more "oomph" (as I like to put it) than stock. I don't have much intention of using it as a track car or anything, I just want it be something I really enjoy driving while still being able to use it as a commute car.
If the car has a "good service history" or "well taken care of" that is just an opinion and not factual in nature. 99%+ of any shop or person that maintains these do so with oils that are not proven to work well for the car, wrong filters, longer service intervals than needed, wrong parts, etc and do many things in reactive in nature vs being proactive.

The car will run on 87 but will not run as well and will have more issues and lower the service life of the engine. This was in all of the gen 1 VT manuals just like the incorrect oil spec is on all of the oil caps that was revised later after hyundai learned of issues with the cars. The newer cars say 87 can be used as well but also says 91+ is recommended and they have better parts and tunes from the oem than the gen 1 cars have. If you want to run 87 you can do so and not lower the service life but you will need to be on top of maintenance, have proper parts on the car, and run a safe stage 0 tune in the car like I set them up on to do so. This will help with the little extra oomph as well.

Bolt on wise that will be determined by end goals and use of the car.
 
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