Veloster Turbo Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've searched high and low for a good boost gauge install on this (and several other) websites and I've yet to find one that was a complete start-to-finish guide that even someone who's never picked up a wrench would feel comfortable following along with. I bought my Tanabe boost gauge, Aeroforce door pod, and 6EE vacuum block over a year ago. I haven't installed them until now because I hadn't the slightest idea of how the electrical system in a car works.

Luckily, I've been going to school at UTI Sacramento the last couple months, paid for by good ol' Uncle Sam and for the last month we've been doing electrical and I finally felt confident enough to install this gauge- and do it professionally.

Now, I'm a big fan of "do it right the first time", So I won't be using crimp connectors or wire taps for this guide, but you may use whatever you prefer. I, however, will be soldering and heat-shrinking all my connections and using Add-a-circuits in lieu of wire taps, which simply turn one fuse slot into two, so this is also a completely reversible install. If you want to go back to stock, you can just pull everything out and plug some holes in a couple grommets with some liquid gasket and it'll be like it never happened.

DISCLAIMER: I am a clever novice at best. Everything in this guide is based off of my own trial and error, Some things could've been done differently and I hope if anybody finds any problems with my guide they'll let me know so I can improve/correct it for everybody, but I can assure you: If you follow along carefully you'll end up with a very nice professionally finished boost gauge that people will constantly ask if it came from the factory like that.

This guide is going to be tailored specifically to the parts listed in the title, but it should work for most digital and analog gauges.

Here's what it'll look like in the end. Camera didn't want to cooperate with the digital number readout in the sunlight, but It's actually very visible during the day. The sun visor is an option too. It made it easier to read the gauge during the day for me.

Boost Gauge With Sun Visor.jpg
Boost Gauge With Sun Visor 2.png

Now onto the parts you'll need if you plan on following this guide exactly:
- One Tanabe boost gauge (or any 52mm boost gauge) - $147 - I got mine on amazon, but from what I can tell it's not available there anymore, SoCal GW has them on their website still.
- One AeroForce door pod - $98 - Aeroforce Technology Inc | Products - Analogic Order
- One 6EE Vacuum block - $49 - https://www.sxthelement.com/Vacuum-Distribution-Block-p/02-01-404.htm
- At least 3 mini fuse taps - $8 - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B015GYN38A/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
- About 10 feet of quality 1/8" (3mm) ID silicone vacuum hose (This stuff comes in black, blue or red which is great) - $19 - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009PYDPRM/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 NOTE: Tanabe includes low-quality clear hose that can be used, but it's cheap and will become brittle over time.
- exactly four 10A mini fuses (Not mini low-profile fuses)
- exactly two 15A mini fuses
- about 30 feet of auto electrical wire (it's good to have extra). The boost gauge uses 24 gauge wire I believe, but I could only find 16 gauge at wal-mart, which matched the fuse taps, so that works fine too, just thicker.
- quality electricians tape
- If you plan to solder like me, you'll need a soldering gun, solder, and some heat shrink tubing (or electricians tape). otherwise, use your crappy crimp connectors.
- medium strength thread locker
- Two 1/4" nuts
- A lot of zip-ties
- about 6 feet of 3/8" convoluted tubing (plastic flex tubing for protecting wires)

Tools:
- I highly recommend getting this cheap trim removal tool set to save you a world of headaches - $7 - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HNMLQAG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
- Medium-small Philips-head screwdriver
- Medium-small flat-head screwdriver
- 10mm socket and ratchet with extension
- needle-nose pliers
- drill and drill bit the size of the vacuum tubing you decided to go with
- razor
- Dremmel with sanding wheel (for sizing the gauge pod)
- wire stripping pliers (with crimpers if you're using crimp connectors)


I'm limited to 10 pictures on this post, so I created a couple collages containing visuals for almost every step.

Let's get started:

Step 1: Disconnect the negative battery cable

Now we're going to remove the driver's side door panel.

Step 2: In the grab handle on the armrest of the door, remove the philips-head screw under the plastic cap

Step 3: Carefully remove the upper corner trim piece as shown

Step 4: Remove the plastic cover behind the inside door handle as shown. Then remove the screw behind it.

Step 5: Pop off the plastic trim on the pull handle. and remove the three 10mm bolts pictured.

Step 6: VERY VERY CAREFULLY AND SLOWLY remove the door panel as pictured.

1- Door Panel Removal.jpg

Now we're going to prep the AeroForce pod for our gauge. It's very easy.

Step 7: Using a dremmel and keeping your boost gauge close by to check the fit, begin to widen the pod. You should end up with a nice snug fit. wrap the gauge in a couple layers of electricians tape if you over-widen the pod.

2- Door Pod Resizing.png

Step 8: The wire for your pressure sensor is already plenty long and has connectors on both ends, but on the four-wire connector, you'll need to lengthen each wire so it will reach the fuse box from the door. Be sure to label each wire after you lengthen it to prevent mix-ups. They're labelled by color in the Tanabe instruction manual. Crimp or solder your connections so they're each about 6 feet long (You'll cut to the exact length later). Next, wrap everything up in your convoluted tubing and completely wrap it with electricians tape.

Step 9: Route your wires through the door as shown. Better instructions on this are included with the AeroForce Pod. You'll need to cut or drill a hole in the grommet with the wire harness from the door just under the wires (Shown) and another hole in the grommet directly across in the small circular grommet and slide your wires straight through and into the car. Once this is done, you can reattach the door panel. Make sure the plastic clips are lined up correctly before you go banging on the panel. I snapped one off.

3- Wire lengthening and Routing.jpg

Step 10: Now that your wires are in the car. Cut the length down so you have about an extra 16 inches from the last grommet they're routed through. you'll need to crimp or solder the add-a-circuits onto the ends of each wire except the ground, which will have a ring connector soldered/crimped onto it. Make sure you keep them labelled! Then it's time to connect them into the fuse box. You'll be using the cig lighter fuse slot for the ignition power, the smart key fuse slot for constant power, and the LH tail lamp fuse slot for your dimmer. The ground will be secured to the bolt near the fuse box as pictured. Once all that's done, double check EVERYTHING, clean up your wire routing with a couple zip ties, and turn on your ignition to make sure the gauge turns on and dims when you turn on your lights. Mine didn't turn on at first because I had accidentally pulled the connector out of the back of the gauge while installing it into the door pod.

4- Wiring into the Fuse Box.jpg

Step 11: Now, your pressure sensor is going to be mounted under the dash and it's going to be reading pressure from the MAP sensor location. Expect to use about 5 feet of vacuum hose, but you'll need to carefully drill or cut a hole in the grommet that goes through the firewall (bulkhead) and route your vacuum hose through it. and use a pair of pliers and a bit of WD-40 to pull it through as shown. If you have a strut tower brace, you may need to take it off to reach the vacuum hose with pliers and pull it through.

5- Vacuum Hose Routing.png

Step 12: Install the 6EE Vacuum Distribution Block. 6EE already has very detailed instructions on their website on how to do this, but I took the pictures and made the collage, so here you go:
Just remember to connect your vacuum hose up to it and secure it with a zip tie.

6- 6EE Vacuum Distribution Block Install.jpg

Step 13: All that needs to be done now is secure your pressure sensor under the dash with a 1/4" nut, connect the air filter to it, attach the other end of the air filter to the vacuum hose you routed to the engine, and plug the 3-wire connector into the sensor. Be sure to zip-tie everything securely in place so you don't get any annoying rattling and you're done!

7- Pressure Sensor Mounting and Hose Routing.png

The boost gauge is accurate plus or minus 1 PSI. You'll get a very good vacuum reading since it's through the MAP sensor. The Car should sit around 17 inHG at idle or higher if it's idling high from warming up or the AC being on. Mine maxed out at 19 PSI in 3rd gear on a pull. The sweeping blue line is pretty hard to see during the day without a visor on the gauge because it's beneath a white foreground, but the number display is very visible in any light. I've gotten a lot of compliments on the gauge. It also makes a nice beep when you turn your car on before it goes through its start-up procedure. As for the AeroForce pod: It's a painted, 3D-printed plastic glued to an OEM corner trim piece with a hole drilled through it. It looks great, but the glue is crap. I tore it off trying to spin the gauge to make it straight and had to re-glue with gorilla glue. No problems since.

I hope this write-up helps anybody still wondering if they'd be able to install a boost gauge themselves. I'd love to hear some feedback as well. I've never done a guide before, so let me know if I should change anything or if you think I did anything wrong. I've had the gauge in for about 3 weeks now and I've had no problem or loss of accuracy from the gauge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,349 Posts
Nice writeup :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
Good detail, and you've tackled a fairly advanced install very nicely. I don't think I've seen many discussions that included the door panel removal and wiring before.

About the only thing I would suggest doing differently (though it is admittedly a personal preference) is mounting the boost sensor in the engine bay and using only a short length of vacuum line. One of the perks of an electronic gauge's remote sensor is not having to pass the vacuum line into the cabin and introduce a potential (even if unlikely) vacuum leak. I'd have more trust in properly sealed and soldered wiring.

Doing it this way also had another perk in my case: My boost sensor is mounted only about a foot away from my throttle body, and has a very short line. I tapped my evap purge solenoid line, even though this is apparently a huge faux-pas because the line is very sensitive to pressure loss. I was prepared to get a vacuum distribution block or TB spacer if things went south, but six months later I've had zero issues and a very responsive and accurate gauge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
@geekdragon I thought about doing that for the same reason, but when I looked at the connector for the sensor I noticed it wasn't weather sealed, nor was the connection. I didn't want to risk any corrosion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
I thought about doing that for the same reason, but when I looked at the connector for the sensor I noticed it wasn't weather sealed, nor was the connection. I didn't want to risk any corrosion.
Gotcha. Probably for the best, then. My Defi boost sensor is hard-wired at the sensor, which seems like a more sensible design for this application.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Gotcha. Probably for the best, then. My Defi boost sensor is hard-wired at the sensor, which seems like a more sensible design for this application.
Yea that's definitely a better design. I'm just happy I don't have to run a vacuum hose into my door with the Tanabe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,840 Posts
Yea that's definitely a better design. I'm just happy I don't have to run a vacuum hose into my door with the Tanabe.
I installed a mechanical gauge and ran the included hard line from the block to the gauge. It was actually relatively easy. I ended up leaving a clip out and ran the line through that hole. The hardest part was having to cut the door pod to fit the mechanical gauge. But since they glue them together poorly mine ended up separating. The good news is that it gave me ample opportunity to cut the stock piece up to fit the gauge and then I used some JB Weld to secure them together. I still need to wire the lights up to it which I'll probably tap into the wiring inside the door so I don't have to run it separately into the car.

Sent from my HTC6545LVW using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Hello All,
I am looking to hook up a boost gauge in my VT. Is the part in the link posted below what is needed to achieve this? it was listed under the VT products but when I clicked on it the link path above changed to: Home > Vehicles > Kia > Forte > 1.6T Koup SX (2014-2016) > Engine / Drivetrain > . Does this part also fit the VT? Any input would be helpful!

Turbo Vacuum Distribution Block by SXTH Element Engineering
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Hello All,
I am looking to hook up a boost gauge in my VT. Is the part in the link posted below what is needed to achieve this? it was listed under the VT products but when I clicked on it the link path above changed to: Home > Vehicles > Kia > Forte > 1.6T Koup SX (2014-2016) > Engine / Drivetrain > . Does this part also fit the VT? Any input would be helpful!

Turbo Vacuum Distribution Block by SXTH Element Engineering
That's the vacuum distribution block that sandwiches between the MAP sensor and intake manifold. It's not 100% necessary, but it keeps you from having to cut into a stock vacuum line which is very convenient. The gamma engine is the same engine in the VT (1.6T) so yes, it will fit. Make sure you get some quality vacuum tubing too so it lasts!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Update: It's been over two years and over 40K miles since I installed this gauge. Not a single problem with it still. 110+ degree summers and occasional drives into the mountains staying over night in low temps and everything is still working perfectly.
10/10 Totally recommend Tanabe.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top