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Ok, so this might be a no brainer for many, but here is the thing:
Assume you changed your wheel and tire from the stock size, your tire pressure in your door jamb may not be the correct one anymore.

Actually I was an idiot and only started to look at this more seriously after I did some research and realized, that the snow tires on a car (same size tires and wheels) is recommended to be inflated to 5-7psi higher than the regular summer or all season tires. That was my wife's Sonata. You have to do more research, depending on what car we are talking about, anyway that's the info i found for her car.

So back to the Veloster, I recently changed wheels and tires, currently 18x8.5 and 225/45/R18s from the stock 18x 17.5 -215/40/R18.
Really didn't help a lot with the ride quality, maybe a little bit. The thing is, I put the same amount of air in it recommended for the stock.
As far as I learned while asking around usually larger air capacity tires requires less pressure than ultra slim thinner ones
(unless it's a snow tire, then it might be more, but check recommendations).

So what I did is instead of the 33psi recommended for stock tires, I went with 30 on the front and 29 on the rear. And the numbers really matter.
I felt the difference immediately. Doesn't feel mushy, still feels solid, but so much more less bumps on little cracks and potholes.
Of course the tires also matter, experience vary based on tire brand and summer/all season etc.

One more thing. Tire pressure gauges. I have 4 different ones, all 4 shows different numbers.
3 of them are trash. Those cheap stick gauges are crap, but many of those dial faced ones are also.
Get a good one, because for these low pro tire cars, 1 psi can make a big difference. One of mine is 3psi off!
Also the ones on the gas stations are terrible too, don't depend on them.
Just a thought!
 

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Yes, tire pressure based on the weight on that tire vs the max sidewall pressure and weight capacity and speed rating use etc is where it's at. It's a difficult concept for some and others is really simple. In reality it's somewhat complicated and relies on experience from those in the know and some trial and error. Mostly because the tire structure varies so much between tire types.
 

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In autocross, we use tire chalk to determine where our tire pressures should be.. you can honestly do the same thing in this scenario, to find out where you are ending up on the tire edge. in your case, you aren't going to have as much sidewall rollover on the street unless you drive like a nut, but you can dial in your pressure this way, and have a visual representation of where your contact patch is.

we do it this way because as you said, tire gauges may not be accurate. this takes their accuracy out of the equation a bit.



you may even be able to safely run less pressures.


this is also a good article... works different but would most likely yield the same result.

 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, tire pressure based on the weight on that tire vs the max sidewall pressure and weight capacity and speed rating use etc is where it's at. It's a difficult concept for some and others is really simple. In reality it's somewhat complicated and relies on experience from those in the know and some trial and error. Mostly because the tire structure varies so much between tire types.
Well, let's just say that I don't trust tire shops anymore. Talked to one of them a while ago, I had another car, I asked him what pressure they filled my new tires, he says 36psi.
I'm like- why?
He says they put the same amount in every car, it's a good average number, works for everything.
It was a Legacy Outback and the recommended was 29psi
 
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