Veloster Turbo Forum banner

41 - 60 of 222 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
There's a difference between oxidated (thickened) oil circulating in the engine, and sludge forming on components in the engine. ALL oil oxidates, even PAO and ester, and the resulting thickened particles of oil continue to circulate through the engine while degrading lubrication. This can sometimes be felt after an oil change when an engine has marginally better performance: the oxidated and thickened oil has been drained and there is less drag on the oil pump. If this thickened oil is left long enough (that is if oil change intervals are disregarded), this thickened oil can settle on parts like oil pans.

The most we can do in terms of oxidation is to minimise the percentage that forms. A good used oil analysis that measures oxidation is essential to determine if the oil is up to the task and how often it should be changed. I have noticed that most used oil analysis in the USA don't include an oxidation value which makes those UOAs useless. My Motul UOA shows 13% oxidation after about 8,000km which is excellent.

Only European-standard ACEA A3 oils can be run in Veloster turbos and API ratings don't count. As we know Rotella oil (which isn't available in Australia) suffers from foaming at high revs, and I cannot understand why anyone would run any diesel engine oil designed for low-revving diesel engines in high-revving petrol engines. Even more moronic are some who run Rotella in motorcycle engines, some of which will do 18,000rpm. My motorcycle is relatively slow-revving but it still cruises at 4,000 to 5,000rpm with a redline of 8,000rpm, and some morons would attempt to run Rotella diesel oil in this engine.

Anyone can run the wrong oil for a period of time and cause no obvious damage, but when the engine prematurely loses compression or begins to burn oil then the damage has been done. Fred runs Mobil 1 and swears by it, but if you have a turbo engine with excessive wear after 150,00km then it's too late.

Complete utter absolute BS PERIOD.

The more you post it is blatantly obvious you do a lot of "reading" and just that "reading" you have no real world exp with High HP Turbo applications. Never have and no nothing about what keeps an engine together. Hint: Your engine is not going to magically last longer than someone else running a different oil. If you think this there is no hope for you. Sell your car and get a bicycle

Keep on reading all your useless theories while the people in the know keep making power
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
In Australia if ACEA A3 is not used then the warranty is voided. Originally it was A5 and I took a risk running A3, but when Hyundai had premature bearing wear problems they changed the specification to A3 so I was one step ahead of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I emailed amsoil tech this weekend:
"Hello, I just bought my 2016 Hyundai Veloster Turbo last weekend. I love the car and plan to drive it for many years. Naturally, I want to take the best care of it I can, so Amsoil is the best choice for engine oil. Your website recommends the Signature Series 5W-30. My owner's manual recommends either 5W-30 or 5W-40 and states the following:

"For better fuel economy, it is recommended to use the engine oil of a viscosity grade 5W-30 (API SM / ILSAC GF-4 / ACEA A5 or above). However, if the engine oil is not available in your country, select the proper engine oil using the engine oil viscosity chart (which shows 5W-30 and 5W-40)."

Mobil 1's website is showing 5W-30 or 0W-30 for greater fuel economy. I compared the Amsoil Signature Series 0W-30 and 5W-30 and they are very similar, although the 0W-30 does have a higher Viscosity Index (171 vs. 163) and higher CCS Viscosity (5,219 @ -35 vs. 3,954 @ -30). The 5W-30 has a lower NOACK Volatility (7.5 vs. 8.4).

My round-trip commute to work is 75 miles, but it's 90% highway. I live in Kansas City where the highs in the summer are usually in the 90's and the highs in the winter can be as low as the teens. My car is garaged at night but is parked outside during the day while I'm at work.

I only have about 700 miles on the car, but want to hurry up and get that factory oil replaced with Amsoil. Since we're heading into winter, I'm leaning towards the Amsoil Signature Series 0W-30. Do you agree? When I change the oil in the spring, would it be beneficial to switch to the heavier Amsoil Signature Series 5W-30 due to the much higher ambient temperatures?"

This was the reply:
"Actually the 0W30 is the best choice for year around use. It provides all of the wear protection of 5W30 while improving both fuel economy and cold temperature operation."

I'm certainly not trying to step on any toes, but there are so many choices out there that it gets a little confusing. I thought this might help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Thanks -x-. I am already a member. I agree, Amsoil's products seem to do an excellent job. I will use them in the Veloster, but currently use them in wifey's hot rod and the two super-sport motorcycles. I know turbos are hard on oil, but so is a 16,000 RPM redline!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
Hyundai Australia are also obsessive about oil viscosity, type (ACEA A3) and using OEM filters. I wouldn't look at anything other than the recommended 5W40. Also it has been known on some engines that a 0W... can cause excessive cold-start engine wear, depending on internal engine tolerances. Thinner oils may not stick where they're supposed to stick, and sometimes when a 5W... or even a 10W... is specified, it's specified for a good reason. My wife's car fits into this category as does my motorcycle. Normally when manufacturers consider a range of oils is suitable for an engine they will list that range in the owner's handbook.

An email from a sales rep is an email from a sales rep, and that doesn't mean that 0W is safe to use in this engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Wow, everything on these cars seems to be tedious! My owner's manual suggests Quaker State oil. When I bought the car, the shop manager said the standard oil change is some Quaker State blend, I assume in 5W-30. I'm certainly not using a "blend" in my car, I want full synthetic. I have full confidence in Amsoil products, but the weight is baffling. I bought my car brand new and am going to run it 'til the wheels fall off, so I'm not worried about trade in, but I want maximum longevity out of it. That's all I'm trying to do, use the right products to keep it in top shape as long as possible. It's my daily driver and I'm gentle with it, but I realize that even doing that, the turbo and direct injection present a unique set of challenges. The email was from an Amsoil tech guy, not a salesman. There's no price difference, so they have nothing to gain by recommending one weight of Amsoil or another. You say thinner oils may not stick where they're supposed to, but I do know that they start flowing faster at start-up. I'm not arguing, and I appreciate the feedback, cbrmale. I'm just trying to figure this little beast out! Does anyone else have an opinion?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
Back to my motorcycle: with it's internal clearances anything less than 10W will not lubricate pistons and cylinder walls when cold. My wife's Opel can run 10W or 5W, but anything less than 5W will not lubricate pistons and cylinder walls when cold. I don't particularly care about the email sender at Amsoil because he knows next to nothing about the Hyundai Gamma engine.

The Opel is a good example: they give four different viscosities in the handbook (5W30, 5W40, 10W30, 10W40) because that's what's suitable for that engine. The Gamma engine is more modern and it has small-bore oil galleries (to reduce oil pumping losses and improve fuel economy), so it cannot run 10W when cold and Hyundai don't have that in the handbook.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
It makes no difference to me what weight it is. They cost within pennies of each other. I guess I'll just stick with the Amsoil 5W-30 SS...per the owner's manual. Thanks for your advice and take care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
5 winter 40 is what i use for daily(8100 x-cess Motul) and 5w30 for track (300v Motul)


It all comes down to your change intervals.. You can pretty much run anything if you change it often enough. To know when its often enough i suggest running oil analysis from Blackstone. You will learn a lot about your specific enigne by running those reports...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I just bought 5 quarts of redline 10w40 switching from royal purple to that... with a magnetic drain plug and oem filter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
ive been running Pennzoil Platinum Pure Plus full synthetic since my car had 1k miles on it, this my first direct injection car and i didnt realize the knocking was normal so I freaked out like is my oil low did they put some garbage in my car so I switched it and have never looked back im at 23k miles now of hard use and zero issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
I just bought 5 quarts of redline 10w40 switching from royal purple to that... with a magnetic drain plug and oem filter
The engine in the Veloster turbo has small diameter oil galleries to reduce oil pumping losses and improve fuel economy, so it needs an oil thinner than 10W in order to flow to bearings and other places. With 10W you will wear out your engine on cold starts and during warm-up. RTFM.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I just switched over to redline 10w40
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
I just switched over to redline 10w40
I'd personally run a 5w-40 in the winter time then go to the 10w-40 in the warmer months. Assuming you're in MD winter still gets pretty damn cold. Though to be honest with you man you'll be long out of the car and moved on by the time you'd see any issues from the cold start wear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Well I'll have another oil change before the cold really hits.....but ur right I will be getting the n performance VT when it comes out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
I just switched over to redline 10w40
I have an oil pressure gauge and in warm weather, cold start, fast idle with 5W40 the oil pressure is 70psi, running 110psi at 2,500rpm, and even higher pressure at higher rpms. With 10W40 these oil pressures would be half as high again or even more, and the engine will almost surely be damaged. Do you not read your owners handbook? Do you not check specifications before doing things? If you don't know what you're doing then take the car to a mechanic who does.

Most new and re-designed engines over the past decade have small diameter oil galleries and require thinner oils.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
I have an oil pressure gauge and in warm weather, cold start, fast idle with 5W40 the oil pressure is 70psi, running 110psi at 2,500rpm, and even higher pressure at higher rpms. With 10W40 these oil pressures would be half as high again or even more, and the engine will almost surely be damaged. Do you not read your owners handbook? Do you not check specifications before doing things? If you don't know what you're doing then take the car to a mechanic who does.

Most new and re-designed engines over the past decade have small diameter oil galleries and require thinner oils.

Please just stop the nonsense, it's getting old
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Yeah for real stop cause the 10w40 will not hurt the engine. I know what I'm doing. This is why I don't really get on the forums any more.
 
41 - 60 of 222 Posts
Top