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Hey guys i can do most things on my car however im a newbie when it comes to brakes


now i need new brake pads cause mine are starting to skretch.

what do i need to look at for replacements, anything specific for our V's ?
 

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Disc brake pads are EASY compared to the old days with drums... My previous car, a friend helped and when it came time to the back brakes, he was telling me, "Now, okay, becareful of the spring because...." and SPROING! There went the spring. We spent more time looking for that damn thing than we did with the brakes!

Today, it's been several years but I think other than normal tools (screwdriver, band-aids, and beer, lots of beer), about the only thing you need is a vice clamp so that you can depress the caliper to relieve the pressure on the pad. Pop it out, put the new one on and take off the clamp. No bleeding of the brake lines, no springs shooting off to the other side of the yard, etc.

Disclaimer: This is a memory from several years back and may be distorted due to getting older and/or the consumption of many adult beverages during the brake changing process and since then. The procedures may have changed since then; along with my underwear (a few times, at least), the weather, and my mind.
 

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Yes, the rear brakes are more complex due to the mechanical emergency brake system.

It's very important to use the manual for the rear brake pad exchange.

The front brakes are not so tricky.

Keep in mind that when you compress the caliper pistons, you are in

effect, pumping all/any trash that accumulated in the caliper back

into the line and possibly back as far as the master cylinder.

***
 

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If you put new pads on worn, scoured rotors, the scouring will rip the new pads to pieces in no time. So to get your money's worth the rotors should be machined to remove any scouring, assuming that this doesn't take the rotor to less than minimum thickness. Mostly it does, so these days new pads usually means new pads and new rotors.

Because of the ESP you should only fit stock brake pads.
 

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Changing disc brake pads is pretty straightforward as long as you have a good jack, and the generic spreader tool.

The thinking on the rotors has changed over the years. It used to be that rotors were expensive and every shop had a special lathe to cut or resurface them and the rotors could be cut several times before they had to be replaced. These days very few shops have that rotor lathe and new rotors come pre-cut and cost a lost less. So now replacing the rotors is kind of standard.

However, if you replace the pads well before they wear out and the rotors look OK I think it's OK to just replace the pads.

But in your case you're hearing the wear indicator noise, so you need to address your rotors. You have 2 choices, either cut your rotors or replace them. If you're doing the brake job yourself you need to be able to take your rotors to a shop that can cut them. This means having your car down while this is being done and having a second car to drive the rotors back and forth to the rare shop that can cut them. Or you can order fresh rotors and do the complete brake job in one pass. If you are new to working on cars I would just order new rotors and replace them too. It's more fun that way and it gives you the confidence that everything is correct.

Then there is the brake fluid thing. IMHO, the last thing you want to do is mess with the brake fluid or bleed the system unless you absolutely have to do that. New cars can go through 4+ brake jobs with the master cylinder and slave cylinders in the calipers working fine and requiring no brake fluid maintenance. The previous poster mentioned the danger of pushing dirt and debris back in to the system when spreading the calipers. That is true but the system is just that little piece of hydraulic brake line. If you've got a Porsche, Ferrari or even an STi or EVO - yeah you probably want to purge the whole system every time with racing grade hydraulic fluid. That's a very expensive pain that can also damage your brake cylinders by making them run dry at first.

If the fluid in your brake reservoir looks good, your brake pedal feels sharp and the calipers spread smoothly using that special tool, I would not mess with the brake fluid or bleeding the brakes at all.
 

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Yes, the rear brakes are more complex due to the mechanical emergency brake system.

It's very important to use the manual for the rear brake pad exchange.

The front brakes are not so tricky.

Keep in mind that when you compress the caliper pistons, you are in

effect, pumping all/any trash that accumulated in the caliper back

into the line and possibly back as far as the master cylinder.


***
Okay...this is actually pretty close to BS

Then there is the brake fluid thing. IMHO, the last thing you want to do is mess with the brake fluid or bleed the system unless you absolutely have to do that. New cars can go through 4+ brake jobs with the master cylinder and slave cylinders in the calipers working fine and requiring no brake fluid maintenance. The previous poster mentioned the danger of pushing dirt and debris back in to the system when spreading the calipers. That is true but the system is just that little piece of hydraulic brake line. If you've got a Porsche, Ferrari or even an STi or EVO - yeah you probably want to purge the whole system every time with racing grade hydraulic fluid. That's a very expensive pain that can also damage your brake cylinders by making them run dry at first.

If the fluid in your brake reservoir looks good, your brake pedal feels sharp and the calipers spread smoothly using that special tool, I would not mess with the brake fluid or bleeding the brakes at all.
Then it gets passed on again.... STOP, please.

Unless you have a torn/broken/missing/loose caliper piston dust boot AND a bad seal around your caliper piston this will NOT HAPPEN. And if those two things are indeed present, you're losing brake fluid anyways.
 

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Ozzy dude... stick to oem stuff.... unless you can afford a little more for something like ebc or something
 

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Discussion Starter #8
mate be honest im happy with oem i just wanted to know if theres something better thats affordable my cousin was telling me hes going to get me brake pads so i wanted to know is there specific brands and makes for the v, that were able to use
 

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The VT is so new that the stock pads are probably the only ones available. Given how well the stock VT brakes work the stock pads are fine.

If you are hearing the screech than your rotors might be compromised.

All brake pads have a layer of material that make a screeching sound so you know to replace them before they wear out. But that means your rotors might be getting dogged out too.

If you are a new enthusiast, I highly recommend doing a brake job yourself as a good introduction to working on cars. It's a dirty job but it's a good job. If you have any doubts you should definitely replace the rotors at the same time. Brake jobs are fun and very satisfying - and a fresh set of rotors lets you stomp on the VT's brakes all that much harder.
 

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Ok, just in case the OP decides to handle doing their own brakes.....simple steps after install to make sure they're bedded in properly so you can enjoy them sooner. Yes, this means do not make your first stop from 100mph to zero!!

Once you have the brake pads (and or rotors) installed and are ready to drive.... Get the car up to 35mph and gently slow the car to 5mph, but do not come to a stop. Then get back up to 35mph and do the same step again. I recommend these two steps be completed at a minimum before actually making and full stops. If you like, you can continue the 35-5mph slow downs a couple more time with increased pedal pressure just to be sure they're properly seated. After you've made at least two 35-5mph decels, you can do a 35/40-0 stop with moderate braking force. Then....enjoy your new brakes. Typical recommendation would still be to take it easy in them for the first 500miles or so...but if you've bedded the pads properly, you don't have to take it easy for that long.

If you chose to do anything close to a race pad for some reason, let us know so we can tell you how to properly bed those in if they don't come with instructions.

Have fun & good luck!
 

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I'm just over 35k miles on the VT and though there is no screeching, I'm getting ready to do the brakes. You could just do the pads but you need to look closely at the rotors to make sure they're not compromised. My intentions are to order new rotors and pads from Piercemotorsports.
Rotors
2012-2013 Hyundai Veloster and Veloster Turbo Performance Rotors

Pads
Piercemotorsports VTRS4 Performance front Brake Pads for Veloster Turbo

And I might even go the next step and get these, but Likely go to a local brake shop for the lines to be installed.
Hyundai Veloster Performance Stainless Braided Brake lines


PS. I think the factory brakes are fine and have no objections using factory replacement parts. Import shark also has rotors if you are interested.
Suspension/Brakes, importshark.com

I know that EBC also makes pads and rotors for the VT, but I couldn't find my link.
 

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So if I were to do the Pierce upgraded rotors, is it still recommended to replace them every brake job? Seems pretty expensive...
 

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So if I were to do the Pierce upgraded rotors, is it still recommended to replace them every brake job? Seems pretty expensive...
Depends on a couple things...the physical condition of the rotor at the time of pad replacement, the ability if a machine shop to be able to resurface them, and of course your own personal choice.

They used to say cross-drilled rotors should never be resurfaced. This idea has actually changed, however some manufacturers of rotors still recommend against it.

I just replace my rotors when I replace the pads, if I use slotted/dimpled/drilled rotors. Yes it's a more expensive brake job, but I will always have the best possible surface for my pads to bed into as well as the most rotor thickness and surface area to dissipate heat.
 

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I'll probably get stoned for this, but...

Resurfacing is not always required.
Sometimes rotor wear is not significant enough to require resurfacing, however it is really a case-by-case decision. However, you should always assume that you will need to replace or resurface.
 

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I'll probably get stoned for this, but...

Resurfacing is not always required.
Sometimes rotor wear is not significant enough to require resurfacing, however it is really a case-by-case decision. However, you should always assume that you will need to replace or resurface.
no stones here....this is actually true. Unless there is significant rotor damage, gouged or warped, there is no reason to REMOVE material from the rotor making it weaker.
 

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no stones here....this is actually true. Unless there is significant rotor damage, gouged or warped, there is no reason to REMOVE material from the rotor making it weaker.
Well, everybody else was all 'turn the rotors' and 'dirt will invade your hydraulic fluid'.
 

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Well, everybody else was all 'turn the rotors' and 'dirt will invade your hydraulic fluid'.
And I think Wildhare put that dirt nonsense to rest....only think to be concerned bout contamination is moisture. Moisture/water degrades the fluids ability to withstand boiling/bubbles..
 

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no stones here....this is actually true. Unless there is significant rotor damage, gouged or warped, there is no reason to REMOVE material from the rotor making it weaker.
With some manufacturers, like Nissan Pathfinder, you actually ruin the rotors when you machine them. They are treated a certain way now to reduce corrosion and increase duty life. You can get like 50-60k out of a set of rotors with no problem and with changing pads two to three times. However, if you machine the rotors at 30k with a pad change, the rotors will only last about 11k after that.
 

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VELOSTER(FS) >2013 > G 1.6 T-GDI > Brake System
Removal
1.
Remove the front wheel & tire.
Tightening torque:
88.3 ~ 107.9 N.m (9.0 ~ 11.0 kgf.m, 65.1 ~79.6 lb-ft)

2.
Loosen the hose eyebolt (C) and caliper mounting bolts (B), then remove the front caliper assembly (A).
Tightening torque:
Brake hose to caliper (C):
24.5 ~ 29.4 N.m (2.5 ~ 3.0 kgf.m, 18.1 ~ 21.7 lb-ft)
Caliper assembly to knuckle (B):
78.5 ~ 98.1 N.m (8.0 ~ 10.0 kgf.m, 57.9 ~ 72.3
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1398373686.979074.jpg A3.
Remove the front brake disc by loosening the screws (A). ImageUploadedByTapatalk1398373756.032682.jpg

Front Brake Pads
1.
Loosen the guide rod bolt (B) and pivot the caliper (A) up out of the way.
Tightening torque:
21.6 ~ 31.4 N.m (2.2 ~ 3.2 kgf.m, 15.9 ~ 23.1 lb-ft)
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1398373911.353340.jpg

2.

Replace pad shim (D), pad retainers (C) and brake pads (B) in the caliper carrier (A).
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1398374022.177102.jpg

Brake disc thickness
Standard: 23 mm (0.906 in)
Service limit: 21.4 mm (0.842 in)
Deviation: Less than 0.005 mm (0.0002 in)
 
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