Veloster Turbo Forum banner

1 - 20 of 661 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,564 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I decided to finally make a thread for those of you who are wondering whether or not a new set of wheels will fit on your Veloster or if they'll even work on the car. This whole "Will these wheels fit my car?" or "will these rub with this suspension?" topic has been covered over and over and over again. But people still ask so I thought it'd be beneficial to put all the info I could find into one epic post. Sound good?

First off, this thread applies to both NAVs and VTs. The suspension is exactly the same. The fenders are exactly the same. Wheels and suspension parts made for one will fit the other. If anyone tells you differently, run.

I will say that this post is targeted more to educate you on how to determine whether or not a wheel will fit on your car instead of just answering with a simple yes or no. So please READ! It will help you!!!!!!

Stock Wheel Specs-

Our bolt pattern is 5x114.3. Hub bore is 67.1mm.
VT Wheels - 18x7.5et49 - 26.5 lbs.
Base NAV Wheels - 17x7et47 - weight?
Remix NAV Wheels - ?????
Style Pack Wheels - 18x7.5et49 - weight?
Tech Pack NAV Wheels - 18x7.5et49 - weight?

Helpful Links-

Before you start to ask any questions, check these sites out. I use the first ALL the time. It lets you enter old specs as well as new specs and lays them out for you with all the numbers. You can even put different tire sizes on there to get an idea of how they will fit. USE THIS SITE! The others are great as well.

WillTheyFit.com
Wheel / Tire Size Comparer
Wheel Offset Calculator

And to get an idea of how a certain size tire is going to fit on any given wheel; this is the best site out there IMO

Tyre Stretch

Now I'll get into different terminology used when talking wheels. If you don't understand the terminology, you're still going to have questions on fitment. LEARN THE TERMINOLOGY.

Offset- often seen as "et" or with a + or - after the width of the wheel. For example; our stock VT wheels are 18x7.5et49. The offset is 49. But what's that number mean?

Whenever your look up wheel specs, they usually have a listing of offsets, such as +53, +45, +29, and so on. These offsets represent the distance in millimeters that the wheel hub (where you actually mount the wheels onto the car) is from the centerline of the wheel. A diagram from a Volk TE37 for Porsche wheel is below to help illustrate:



As you can see, a line the goes down the center of the wheel, and shows that the right side of the wheel is on the outside toward the fender, whereas the left side of the wheel is on the inside toward the suspension. As the diagram shows, the wheel hub is directly on the center line, which means it has a zero offset. When the wheel hub is pushed out toward the outside of the wheel, then the wheel has positive offset; when the hub is pushed in toward the inside of the wheel, then the wheel has negative offset. Makes sense, right? Perhaps it does, but how does this affect wheel fitment?

Herein lies the problem with offset. Wheels have to clear 3 main things in order for them not only to fit on the car, but also roll freely: fenders, suspension, and brakes. Since ever car is different, not every wheel offset will work. Some cars, such as the 350Z and M3, have plenty of room between the outside fender and the suspension. Other cars, such as the 93-01 Impreza, have nowhere near as much space. Still other cars, such as the S2000 have an average amount of room in the front of the car, but barely any room in the rear. On top of all this, wheel offsets are also affected by the width of the wheel. Thus, a wheel that is only 7.5 inches wide fits differently than a wheel that is 10.5 inches wide with the same exact offset. Remember, the offset is measured from the centerline of the wheel, so the wider the wheel, the distance available from the centerline. This can very much come into play when there’s a big brake kit on the car, since you’ll need to choose an offset that will clear the brake calipers.

Despite all the possible complications, here are a few generalizations that will help with your wheel offset decisions:

High offsets (such as +50 for example) make the wheel fit inward toward the suspension. This helps the wheel clear the outside fender, but since the wheel goes in more, it could pose problems clearing brakes or contacting the suspension.
Low offsets (such as +25 or anything in the negative for example) make the wheel fit outward toward the fender. This helps the wheel clear a big brake kit, but it could pose problems with your wheels and tires rubbing against your fenders.
Since every car is different, certain offsets (typically lower offsets) combined with a certain wheel bolt pattern can cause undo stress on your wheel bearings, causing them to wear out prematurely. For this reason, many wheel manufacturers simply do not manufacture wheels in certain fitments.

Taken from here

So now that you're an expert on offset, here's the PERFECT offsets for our cars (roughly). From what I've seen on the forums and dealt with on my NAV, here's what I see fitting.

18x8et38 will sit flush. And by flush I mean that if your car was low enough to tuck wheel, 18x8et38 would tuck without any issues. It wouldn't grab fender like my XXRs in 18x8.75et35 did.

Take the 18x8et38, enter it in as the "old" wheel on willtheyfit.com, put your "new" wheels specs in and compare. If it pokes anymore than the 18x8et38, it will catch fender if you're low enough. If it pokes less, it will fit. It just won't be as flush.

If you are on stock suspension or just on lowering springs, a small amount of POKE WILL BE FINE! I am 4 inches down so need to consider a little more when picking out wheels that will "fit" my car.

This is an 18x8.75et35 on my NAV. POKE-



This is an 18x9.5et45 on my NAV. As far as I know, this size will not work on the front as it will hit the struts with the back of the wheel-



Wheel Diameter- coming soon

Tire Sizes- coming soon

Camber- huh?

Camber angle is the measure in degrees of the difference between the wheels vertical alignment perpendicular to the surface. If a wheel is perfectly perpendicular to the surface, its camber would be 0 degrees. Camber is described as negative when the top of the tires begin to tilt inward towards the fender wells. Consequently, when the top of the tires begin to tilt away from the vehicle it is considered positive.

Negative camber is becoming increasingly more popular because of its visual appeal. The real advantages to negative camber are seen in the handling characteristics. An aggressive driver will enjoy the benefits of increased grip during heavy cornering with negative camber. During straight acceleration however, negative camber will reduce the contact surface between the tires and road surface.

Regrettably, negative camber generates what is referred to as camber thrust. When both tires are angled negatively they push against each other, which is fine as long as both tires are in contact with the road surface. When one tire loses grip, the other tire no longer has an opposing force being applied to it and as a result the vehicle is thrust towards the wheel with no traction.

Zero camber will result in more even tire wear over time, but may rob performance during cornering. Ultimately, optimal camber will depend upon your driving style and conditions the vehicle is being driven in.

Taken from here

So now you're an expert on camber as well? Awesome. But how can it be applied to our Velosters?

The front camber can be changed via camber plates or camber bolts. I have only adjusted via the camber plates. Camber plates come built into most coil overs offered for our cars and are super easy to adjust. There are 4 bolts on top of the strut tower. Loosed them, push in, and you have camber.

Since I have not personally used camber bolts, just check here for more information.

Contrary to what most may think, it is possible to camber our rears. I did a DIY of this which can be seen here-

Rear Camber DIY

General rule of thumb when cambering-

On a 17" Wheel every degree of negative camber added to the suspension equates to 3.8 mm of Fender Clearance.

On a 18" Wheel every degree of negative camber added to the suspension equates to 4.0 mm of Fender Clearance.

On a 19" Wheel: Every degree of negative camber added to the suspension equates to 4.2mm of Fender Clearance.

On a 20" Wheel: Every degree of negative camber added to the suspension equates to 4.4mm of Fender Clearance.

This is the same 18x8.75et35 wheel as seen above but with -2.75 degrees of additional camber. CLEARANCE!



Caster & Toe- coming soon

I will add more to this thread when I have time but this should do for now. If you see anything I missed/need to correct please let me know and I'll update it. If anything here is unclear, just ask and I'll help you out.

POST PICTURES OF YOUR SETUP WITH ALL SPECS TOO!!!!!!

MOD EDIT: Only post wheel specs, brief description of fitment and pictures. All other posts will be deleted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,564 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
***reserved***

I have much more planned for this thread including caster&toe and our stock alignment specs, wheel spacers, wobble nuts, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,193 Posts
Front: 19x8.5 +35
Rear: 19x9.5 +42

19x9.5 +42 will fit for the rear with POKE :] but once again wouldnt fit in the fronts so i stuck with 19x8.5 +35

Mod Edit: Please add pictures and tire size.
 
  • Like
Reactions: VelostT2014

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,101 Posts
I know this will probably get deleted, however, according to signature you're dropped on eibachs. In the pic you post are you already dropped? If so can you post a pic of the front from a similar angle
Yea i was already dropped in that pic, here are shots from the front (0 rub, doesn't catch on anything, only thing I would do is get wider tires, the stocks had 3k miles on em or something, couldn't justify swapping to new one just yet)





if you need any additional pics just lemme know.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,048 Posts
Well since I don't aftermarket wheels I'll contribute the only way I can...

Here's how Stock wheels look with 10mm spacers

Hellaflush.jpg

Here's how they look with 15mm spacers

New Flush.jpg

If you are lowered the MAX size spacers you can use is 20mm's without rubbing issues. 25mm's will give you some Poke & you will have slight rubbing issues if you have a drop. Hope this helped!
 
  • Like
Reactions: lagonwagon and dare

·
Registered
Joined
·
931 Posts
nothing fancy... stock VT rims... 8mm "Dorman" spacers all around
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1393603166.650674.jpg
side by side before and after
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1393603179.311593.jpg
all around installed top left=front, bottom left=rear, right=front
no rub, no vibration, no misalignment, stock bolts, and of course No poke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Hi i'm a NOOB with tire fitment, i want a clean look no camber, no stretch, My question is; if i buy 18x8.5 +35 offset ( concave wheel ) would it rub if i fit 235 tire on it? I don't want the tire out of the fender too, i'm i fine? I won't drop the car too... Thanks you

Mackv said me ; If your not dropped you should be fine. +35 may have a very slight poke but not bad at all

My question is; what does poke mean?! ( i'm french ) If it mean touch a little bit, could i put a +25 offset or it will go too outside of the fender?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,564 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Don't go +25.

235s will be squared with an 8.5 inch wheel. If you have passengers in your car with a full trunk and hit a bump, I'm guessing that you will rub.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
So shitty to size wheel! i wanted wider, i'll maybe leave the stock rim there...! 235 under... :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,107 Posts
So shitty to size wheel! i wanted wider, i'll maybe leave the stock rim there...! 235 under... :(
So the best size to fit stock is 18x8 or 8.25 +38 and a 225 tire
I don't think 8.25 is a popular rim width. But yes. 7.5" to a 8" rim width and +49 to a +40 offset are pretty much the standard if you want to drop and not have any problem. 225/40 would be the biggest I'd recommend for lowered vehicles unless. I know I sound like an ass, but all this is on the first post.

Like alek said, our car do not like anything bigger than a 8" rim width and anything lower than +40 offset. I mean, you can fit a 18x8.5 +35 as long as you don't slam your VT.

Trust me, and alek too, if it was possible, you'd be seeing a lot more VT's/NAV's with 18x10 +25 or something crazy like that. That size have MAD concave and a 5" lip or bigger. That is what I want :D

I have decided to just go with a 18x7.5 +38 wheel (I know alek, LAME, but whatever lol) I want to slam my VT and have decent rims. I believe with 18x7.5 +38 and 225/40R18 Potenza S-04 I can slam the VT pretty low with minimum clearance issues.

PS: btw alek, if you can guess what wheel I want with the size I gave you, I'd be impressed :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,564 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I don't think 8.25 is a popular rim width. But yes. 7.5" to a 8" rim width and +49 to a +40 offset are pretty much the standard if you want to drop and not have any problem. 225/40 would be the biggest I'd recommend for lowered vehicles unless. I know I sound like an ass, but all this is on the first post.

Like alek said, our car do not like anything bigger than a 8" rim width and anything lower than +40 offset. I mean, you can fit a 18x8.5 +35 as long as you don't slam your VT.

Trust me, and alek too, if it was possible, you'd be seeing a lot more VT's/NAV's with 18x10 +25 or something crazy like that. That size have MAD concave and a 5" lip or bigger. That is what I want :D

I have decided to just go with a 18x7.5 +38 wheel (I know alek, LAME, but whatever lol) I want to slam my VT and have decent rims. I believe with 18x7.5 +38 and 225/40R18 Potenza S-04 I can slam the VT pretty low with minimum clearance issues.

PS: btw alek, if you can guess what wheel I want with the size I gave you, I'd be impressed :D
My first guess guess would be XXR 535s given those specs…but there's a lot out there and I'm probably wrong lol
 
1 - 20 of 661 Posts
Top