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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

Time for some new tyres for the Turbo.

Runing standard turbo rims, I live in the country so it's mostly highway driving and can get pretty wet out my way.

I've been reading up on reviews, would like to hear thoughts of people who run them on their Velosters.

Don't have a super big budget, around 1k would be good to keep it.

Cheers
 

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If you have to deal with standing water Michelin Pilot A/S 3 would be your best option hands down, as far as all season tires go.
 

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Assuming he needs a summer tire, something like a Potenze SO4, Michelin SuperSport or Continental ExtremeContact DW would be my choice for a summer tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm in Australia, so no need for summer/winter tyres as I don't have snow that close to me and I won't be driving in it.
 

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I'm in Australia, so no need for summer/winter tyres as I don't have snow that close to me and I won't be driving in it.
the A/S 3 is NOT a winter tyre, at least I wouldn't use it for snow. I use it for spring, summer, and autumn. it's excellent for both dry and wet.
 

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Bender have a look at the Jax tyre's website. It will at least give you an idea of what's available and price.
 

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I'm in Australia, so no need for summer/winter tyres as I don't have snow that close to me and I won't be driving in it.
Bender if you don't see much rain and no snow, you can go with a Summer tire rather than an all season tire. It is similar here in CA and I'm going with Potenza RE-71Rs for my Sky. They are extreme summer tires that are okay in the wet and a definite "Don't use in snow ever" tire. First time trying them out (they just were released in the Spring IIRC) so I can't review them. I do autocross and their 200 treadwear rating is the lowest you can use so that's why I'm getting these. They run a bit over your budget though at about $280 per tire.

Any regular summer tire though would be a good choice if you see no snow and there are many good tires out there that run in the $150 per tire range. The real benefit to summer tires is they usually offer more grip than a all weather or winter tire. Extreme summer tires offer even more performance than summer tires (in general) but you usually pay a lot more and have a bit shorter tire life.

As with anything, it's a balance between your budget, how much performance you want out of your tire, and how often you're willing to replace them.
 

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I saw that too -X-. Plan on doing them in a couple weeks and will be trying them out early in September. Will report back to you and see how they do. I will be comparing them to the POS tires I have now. They are Delinte DH2 all season Z rated radials. They are crap. 420 treadwear rating and all of $80 a tire. Took them autocrossing and was about 2-4 seconds off the upper part of the pack. We'll see if I'm a little more competitive with the Potenzas. LOL
 

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You are from Melbourne where it's often cloudy and wet, but it doesn't ever rain heavily so aquaplaning resistance is not an issue. For example where I live in Canberra we have only one-tenth of the wet days of Melbourne, but when it rains it's often in the range of 30mm to 40mm per day, and sometimes as much as 60mm to 80mm.

For mostly country road driving at a reasonable price with good durability I would go with another set of the stock Hankook Ventus Prime 2. These will be close to your budget, they have good grip on dry and wet roads, are quite long lasting and I have driven mine in torrential rain at speed and aquaplaning resistance is excellent. The tyres suggested by the Americans are much more than your budget, but you should be able to get the Hankooks for around $1000 fitted.

One trick I found with the Hankook Ventus Prime 2 is to run as much tyre pressure as you can bear. I run 280kpa / 40psi and that improves grip and reduces wear. If my current wear pattern continues I should get about 80,000km out of them, by rotating them left to right and front to rear every 7,500km (right rear to left front, left front to left rear, left rear to right front, right front to right rear), and by running high tyre pressures.
 

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That's too wide for Australian Design Rules and would make his car unroadworthy, which would mean his insurance would no longer cover him. The rule in Australia is not roadworthy means that insurance coverage is void, and insurance companies are big on this one. Also he would run a risk of aquaplaning on the rare day when it rains heavily in Melbourne. Legally the maximum width increase is plus one size or 225mm wide in this case.

We had a member of this forum smash his VT up when he aquaplaned with 235 section tyres. The weight of the car squeezes water from under the tread into the grooves for it to be ejected, and the VT is quite light particularly at the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You are from Melbourne where it's often cloudy and wet, but it doesn't ever rain heavily so aquaplaning resistance is not an issue. For example where I live in Canberra we have only one-tenth of the wet days of Melbourne, but when it rains it's often in the range of 30mm to 40mm per day, and sometimes as much as 60mm to 80mm.

For mostly country road driving at a reasonable price with good durability I would go with another set of the stock Hankook Ventus Prime 2. These will be close to your budget, they have good grip on dry and wet roads, are quite long lasting and I have driven mine in torrential rain at speed and aquaplaning resistance is excellent. The tyres suggested by the Americans are much more than your budget, but you should be able to get the Hankooks for around $1000 fitted.

One trick I found with the Hankook Ventus Prime 2 is to run as much tyre pressure as you can bear. I run 280kpa / 40psi and that improves grip and reduces wear. If my current wear pattern continues I should get about 80,000km out of them, by rotating them left to right and front to rear every 7,500km (right rear to left front, left front to left rear, left rear to right front, right front to right rear), and by running high tyre pressures.

Yeah I've had no problems with the tyres on it.

I live closer to Ballarat than Melbourne so a bit more rain out here and colder but I've not had a problem with heavy rain driving, always good to ask if there is something better.

Cheers mate.
 

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I know Ballarat and it can be cold and wet and even snow sometimes, like us the other day. I also run Hankook tyres on my wife's car because they had good reviews, and she was more than happy with the grip especially in the wet where the original Pirelli tyres were diabolical, and they lasted well. When they eventually wore out I got some more Hankooks for her.
 

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great to see a couple Melbourne Aus or there abouts peeps on here
 

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I used to live in Melbourne before I moved to Bendigo for a couple of years and then to Canberra. From Canberra I drive to Sydney a few times a year and I usually drive to Melbourne once a year to visit my family.
 

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That's too wide for Australian Design Rules
You need to stop spreading incorrect information. ADRs state:
Overall Nominal Diameter
The overall diameter of any tyre fitted to a passenger car or passenger car derivative must not be more than 15mm larger or 26mm smaller than that of any tyre designated by the vehicle manufacturer for that model.
Maximum Passenger Car Tyre and Rim Width
Tyres fitted to passenger cars or passenger car derivatives must not be more than 30% wider than vehicle manufacturer’s widest optional tyre. The rim width must not exceed the recommendations for the tyre fitted.

So the diameter of any wheel fitted (based on the 18) must be >=614mm and <= 644mm. The diameter of the 235 40 18 is 645mm. And yes unfortunately, that 1mm will make your vehicle un-roadworthy and void your insurance.

As far as our wheels are concerned (7.5") the max tyre width is 253.5mm so a 245 tyre. Based on ADRs the max width wheel is 9.5".

As an aside maximum allowed track increase is 25mm so an offset in the range of +37 - +49
 
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Assuming he needs a summer tire, something like a Potenze SO4, Michelin SuperSport or Continental ExtremeContact DW would be my choice for a summer tire.
I have the S04 on currently after coming from the A/S 3 and it definitely felt like the A/S3 were better in every way even with 10mm less tread. The hydroplane resistance on them is out of this world and they actually got me through up to 6" of snow as long as there wasnt any ice. Definitely not a winter tire by any means though, it gets scary in snow.
 
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You need to stop spreading incorrect information. ADRs state:
Overall Nominal Diameter
The overall diameter of any tyre fitted to a passenger car or passenger car derivative must not be more than 15mm larger or 26mm smaller than that of any tyre designated by the vehicle manufacturer for that model.
Maximum Passenger Car Tyre and Rim Width
Tyres fitted to passenger cars or passenger car derivatives must not be more than 30% wider than vehicle manufacturer’s widest optional tyre. The rim width must not exceed the recommendations for the tyre fitted.

So the diameter of any wheel fitted (based on the 18) must be >=614mm and <= 644mm. The diameter of the 235 40 18 is 645mm. And yes unfortunately, that 1mm will make your vehicle un-roadworthy and void your insurance.

As far as our wheels are concerned (7.5") the max tyre width is 253.5mm so a 245 tyre. Based on ADRs the max width wheel is 9.5".

As an aside maximum allowed track increase is 25mm so an offset in the range of +37 - +49
I need to copy and save this for the next time someone gives me crap about California CARB laws. Wow.

Of course on the flip side I can't help but think how many super lowered imports I've seen with 15 degrees of negative camber on tires sticking out 10" with a tire that is 4" too narrow mounted to it and how something like this would stop that quick.
 
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Double wow. Do they just calculate by tire spec dimensions or actually measure? I'd fight that diameter restriction, as the diameter gets smaller over time as the rubber wears away.
Based on specs.
 
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