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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Don't believe it for a minute.

The steering ratio is a gear set that cannot be altered except by changing out

the steering gear box. Which by the way is not even a dealer repairable item.

Hyundai says this is not a serviceable item and can only be replaced.

What the dealer is doing, by way of altering the computer logic of the steering

system, is adjusting the input/output relationship of the electrical assist part of

the steering. The steering is not drive by wire as some may think. If you don't

believe me, simply sit in the car with everything "off" and turn the steering wheel.

It's hard to do, but you will see, the wheels still turn. They steering is still directly

and mechanically connected to the wheels by way of a steering gear box.

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Even if they didn't change the "Ratios" but only changes the input/output of the electrical assists, doesn't it still create the same result of a tighter steering feel? That's what my desire was for from the start and the flash seems to have done.
 

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the turn radius does not change.


think about when you're changing the "Acceleration" settings of your mouse in windows. you aren't changing how fast the ball is moving or the distance it must travel you're just changing the multiplier.
 
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
the turn radius does not change.


think about when you're changing the "Acceleration" settings of your mouse in windows. you aren't changing how fast the ball is moving or the distance it must travel you're just changing the multiplier.
Maybe I used the wrong word in my original post title. I only claim that the flash changed the actual "feel" of the applying force to the steering wheel. Previously the VT's steering felt a little too "floaty" for me. By flashing to the Rspec steering, it seems to have tightened up the feel.
 

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i completely get what you're saying. i wouldn't mind my steering being a bit heavier too.
 

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Yep, since the steering is electronically assisted there is no problem with adjusting the "feel" of the steering to

make it easier or harder to turn the steering wheel. With the introduction of this type steering assist there were

many complaints regarding the sensitivity of the steering with many calling it terrible names because they had

trouble adapting to this newly developed steering assist.

Since it is electrical assist there are many things they can do with this steering and how it feels for you when

you drive the car. The neatest which is at highway speed the steering can adjust to help control the steering

by making it a slight bit harder to turn the wheel, but then in the urban setting it can adjust itself to make the steering

more easy to turn the steering wheel. Ah, the wonders of automotive engineering.

***
 

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Electric power steering is not exactly newly-developed. My wife's car of 2004, originally released in 2000, has electric power steering and my previous car also had it (2007 originally released in 2004). Electric power steering is primarily for improved fuel economy because there isn't a hydraulic pump running all of the time, rather energy to assist steering is only used when needed, and this energy comes from the alternator.

There are various versions of Veloster Turbo steering with the European mode heavier for greater road feel, and this setup has probably been used on the American R-spec model, and the Australian mode is heavier again. It takes some muscle to get the car to change direction at speed but it does have excellent road feel. There are other steering changes with European / Australian cars (and probably R-spec) having different geometry for less Ackermann effect and better front wheel grip, and the Australian version has a different steering rack.
 

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Electric power steering is not exactly newly-developed. My wife's car of 2004, originally released in 2000, has electric power steering and my previous car also had it (2007 originally released in 2004). Electric power steering is primarily for improved fuel economy because there isn't a hydraulic pump running all of the time, rather energy to assist steering is only used when needed, and this energy comes from the alternator.

There are various versions of Veloster Turbo steering with the European mode heavier for greater road feel, and this setup has probably been used on the American R-spec model, and the Australian mode is heavier again. It takes some muscle to get the car to change direction at speed but it does have excellent road feel. There are other steering changes with European / Australian cars (and probably R-spec) having different geometry for less Ackermann effect and better front wheel grip, and the Australian version has a different steering rack.
I'd love to see part numbers to confirm this, as I am a bit skeptical. I have an R-Spec and love it, but I find it hard to believe they would do a nearly complete redesign of nearly everything mechanical on the car (not just what is in this post, but others of yours as well) for just one market. I can see different tunes, for steering and the engine, but entirely new parts for just one market, and not the home market at that, sounds a little unbelievable.
 
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Manufacturers redesign parts for different markets all of the time; more often because of different legislative requirements but also for driving preferences. Changing the steering geometry is an easy thing to do (two parts: left and right steering links). Less Ackermann (racing cars have no Ackermann) means better bite but greater steering wheel kickback, so it's changing the degree of compromise. As far as steering racks goes, I was in a workshop a few years ago with a Veloster turbo disguised as a NA with three different steering controllers (flashed with different levels of assistance) and two different steering racks that they were trying back-to-back. By that stage it had different rear dampers to the European model, and a different rear axle assembly to the European model with more negative camber for less oversteer. Again these are minor modifications: dampers are produced by Sachs for whatever specification Hyundai order, while the changed camber comes from the two trailing arms (left and right).

I joked with Neil that Hyundai wouldn't let him have what he wanted because I thought Hyundai wouldn't let him go that far. At the time I was so convinced that I didn't consider buying a Veloster turbo until I read some road reports that were very, very complimentary to the steering and handling. One rated the car as the best handling front wheel drive they had ever driven. But I still wasn't convinced, until I took a demonstrator on a lengthy drive on a rough, winding road and then I was convinced. I got into the car, I drove it hard and it responded beautifully with great feedback, although the salesman in the passenger seat was rigid with fear. I bought that demonstrator.

Hyundai Australia later publicised the Veloster turbo with Australian input and mentioned the dampers, the rear axle and the steering changes. I believe our steering rack ended up being variable ratio.
 

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Manufacturers redesign parts for different markets all of the time; more often because of different legislative requirements but also for driving preferences. Changing the steering geometry is an easy thing to do (two parts: left and right steering links). Less Ackermann (racing cars have no Ackermann) means better bite but greater steering wheel kickback, so it's changing the degree of compromise. As far as steering racks goes, I was in a workshop a few years ago with a Veloster turbo disguised as a NA with three different steering controllers (flashed with different levels of assistance) and two different steering racks that they were trying back-to-back. By that stage it had different rear dampers to the European model, and a different rear axle assembly to the European model with more negative camber for less oversteer. Again these are minor modifications: dampers are produced by Sachs for whatever specification Hyundai order, while the changed camber comes from the two trailing arms (left and right).

I joked with Neil that Hyundai wouldn't let him have what he wanted because I thought Hyundai wouldn't let him go that far. At the time I was so convinced that I didn't consider buying a Veloster turbo until I read some road reports that were very, very complimentary to the steering and handling. One rated the car as the best handling front wheel drive they had ever driven. But I still wasn't convinced, until I took a demonstrator on a lengthy drive on a rough, winding road and then I was convinced. I got into the car, I drove it hard and it responded beautifully with great feedback, although the salesman in the passenger seat was rigid with fear. I bought that demonstrator.

Hyundai Australia later publicised the Veloster turbo with Australian input and mentioned the dampers, the rear axle and the steering changes. I believe our steering rack ended up being variable ratio.
Again, I'd love for you to be right, but until part numbers are confirmed, it's all just speculation. ;)
 
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That's not actually a Veloster in Australia but rather a reworked Sonata.

Hyundai realized a long time ago what they could put over on them

upside down folks. Duh!

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Again, I'd love for you to be right, but until part numbers are confirmed, it's all just speculation. ;)
I know Neil Bates the man who did the development work and I saw what he was working on at the time. Unless you consider me a liar what I wrote is exactly what happened.

What always confused me is that British and European road tests have always critisised the steering and rear damping, which were the two areas improved by Neil. Britain and Europe should have adopted the Australian modifications to their setup.

Of course the normal North American version has only one minor suspension modification from the Korean version. They fitted a different torsion beam to the rear axle. Europe re-worked the steering and suspension while Australia did some more work on that.
 

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I don't consider you a liar, but I just don't consider hearsay proof. You want everyone to believe you? Do some research, find the part numbers, and prove your case. It would be beneficial to all since then people could order these "better" parts and try them out for themselves.
 

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We all consider you a liar. You regularly post inaccurate data and hearsay. Whenever anyone bothers to point them out you lash out and avoid the forum for a week.
If you don't want people to question your accuracy you need to provide photos, numbers or stop whining when people call you out.
 

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You would do well with a steering rack from an Australian model on a US car (the steering wheel would be on the wrong side). My experience of the Australian upgraded dampers is they work well and there aren't any problems with rear suspension bump-steer. But they are built to a price and wear like all other OEM dampers, and the wear of the dampers on my car is starting to become obvious after 35,000km. Life expectancy of good OEM dampers is usually about 60,000km. This is why Konis are preferable because they last longer and can be adjusted to compensate for wear when it eventually happens. Given a choice of upgrading North American suspension with coilovers and dampers of unknown durability or Konis with upgraded springs, I would always pick Konis and upgraded springs because Konis are quality.

Starting with European steering and suspension which is probably the same as the American R-spec, they did more work on the car.

Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo | Car Reviews | NRMA Motoring & Services

"Without getting too technical, after countless hours of mapping the standard Veloster's suspension performance, the tech guys changed the design of the lower control arm to give it a different roll centre. That gives the suspension a bit more roll and the aim is to provide better balance between the front and rear suspension.

Springs remain the same but the dampers have been specially tuned to suit the extra power and torque. The steering rack is new as well and it now has slightly less turns lock to lock making it more direct. This mod will carry over to all Velosters."

Review - Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Review and First Drive - Australia | CarShowroom.com.au

"We could bash-out another 1,000+ words on Hyundai’s ‘Australianization’ of the suspension and steering calibration for the Veloster SR Turbo. We don’t have that space, but enthusiasts will be pleased to hear the company has its own shock absorber dyno at its Sydney head office and local engineers worked closely with their counterparts from Korea and engineers from suspension specialist ZF-Sachs.

After comprehensive local testing and development, the rear roll-centre was lowered slightly and ZF-Sachs supplied unique shims for the dampers to deliver mostly stiffer rebound. As a result, in back-to-back tests the Hyundai Veloster SR turbo attained a higher peak ‘G’ force and held it longer than either the ‘atmo’ Veloster or an un-named direct competitor."

Because the development work was done in Queanbeyan near where I live, Neil used the skid pan at the Sutton Road driver training complex about 10km from his workshop. This is where they got the g-force measurements.

https://www.suttonroad.com.au/

This is how I got to learn of the project, because I was managing a fleet at the time and I put the fleet drivers through an advanced driver training programme at Sutton Road (and I had to do the training program too). Afterwards, the trainer invited me to the workshop to look at what they were doing to the prototype turbo.
 

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We don't get multi-modal steering and the steering is the heaviest I have experienced in a power-steered car, especially when cornering fast.


The VT is priced and equipped differently to North America, and when it was released direct comparisons were made to a range of hot European cars available in our market. It's obvious that Hyundai expected that to happen so they had the VT worked-over to make sure that it compared well. It comes as one expensive model, manual or automatic.
 

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I was able to get this done at my local dealership today.

The change is wonderful. The steering feels much heavier, and in turn, feels so much sportier on turn in.

It clearly is artificial, but I'm loving the solid feel so far. It also did 'fix' the floaty feel at highway speeds.
 

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I don't have rigid collars yet, but as a free 'mod', this update is fantastic.

Not sure of the right wording, but on turn in it 'loads up' really well, a ton like my genesis R spec did
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I was able to get this done at my local dealership today.

The change is wonderful. The steering feels much heavier, and in turn, feels so much sportier on turn in.

It clearly is artificial, but I'm loving the solid feel so far. It also did 'fix' the floaty feel at highway speeds.
Ah Excellent, I'm happy someone else was able to get it and its not just me playing mind games with myself haha!
 
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