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Dang it, my dealer won't touch it. "If we change it and something goes wrong you could hold us liable" kind of deal. Not negotiable. The dealership OP used is like an hour and 40 from where I live, so it wouldn't be impossible for me to take the ride out sometime, but they might not be happy if lots of Veloster owners start flooding them with requests. Plus, this was done to fix a problem, I'd be doing this just because I wanted to.
 

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Dang it, my dealer won't touch it. "If we change it and something goes wrong you could hold us liable" kind of deal. Not negotiable. The dealership OP used is like an hour and 40 from where I live, so it wouldn't be impossible for me to take the ride out sometime, but they might not be happy if lots of Veloster owners start flooding them with requests. Plus, this was done to fix a problem, I'd be doing this just because I wanted to.
Yeah I need to check on the local dealer that may do this
 

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is this done in the ECU? how would it interact with an existing custom tune?
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
is this done in the ECU? how would it interact with an existing custom tune?
I am not sure, tech said it was a "flash" so I'm guessing it would be interacting with your ECU, but I'm not really initiated with stuff like that
 

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I'm guessing it's something more like flipping a switch in the options, much like using VAGCOM for an VW/Audi.

I'll be getting my tune within a month, and I'll report back if the steering feel was reverted back or not.
 

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More likely a "placebo affect" with the rigid collars than actually an improvement.

You cannot always rely on advertisement for factual and true reporting for they

for sure, do have a dog in the race.

Just my opinion.

***
 

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the rigid collars do work especially if your K-frame is out of alignment from the get go.

you can tell by the degree of difficulty you have slipping them in. if you have no difficulty your k-frame was in alignment. if you have to fight to get them in, well... it wasnt.


i have rigid collars AND as of yesterday i've been updated to the r-spec programming. the wheel feels heavier to turn. i'll report back in a few days :)
 
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the rigid collars do work especially if your K-frame is out of alignment from the get go.

you can tell by the degree of difficulty you have slipping them in. if you have no difficulty your k-frame was in alignment. if you have to fight to get them in, well... it wasnt.
You don't know what you are talking about... And you work for somebody who knows somebody who once had lunch with a person related to one of the five companys that has made or is making rigid collars. I call that bias.
 

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its true, i know too much :(


too fast for my own good LOL
 

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I fitted rigid collars to mine and was expecting great things when I took it out. For sure the car felt tighter without the front subframe chattering against the body structure, but in terms of grip, balance and feel, there was no difference. The run out of my suburb is quite hilly with several, large radius roundabouts, and before rigid collars the car was comfortable entering those roundabouts at 60 and exiting at a bit over 70, and after rigid collars it was comfortable at the same speed. When I thought about it I wasn't surprised, because all the rigid collars do is take away 1 or 2mm of movement between the subframe and the rest of the car, and 1 or 2mm tighter is not going to make a noticeable difference. I continued my drive through rough country roads with sweeping bends which I use a lot, and I still didn't notice a difference. Yes the car feels tighter, no it doesn't steer or handle better nor does the steering have greater road feel.

Hyundai are notorious for over-light power steering. Some years ago they released their newest, latest and greatest i30 in Australia and were expecting great reviews from the journalists they flew to their favourite driving roads near the Gold Coast in Queensland. Those journalists condemned the car for over-light steering which lacked road feel. They condemned it very badly, and Hyundai took their demo cars away and re-flashed the steering and gave the cars to the same journalists the next day, but still they were not good enough. So Hyundai re-did the steering a second time and at the third attempt, the journalists regarded the i30 as being acceptable but not good. The publicity from that debacle was bad at the time, and later I drove that model of i30 and the car handled quite well for an everyday small hatch, but the steering gave me no confidence. I couldn't push the car beyond about 70% because I had no feedback through the steering wheel.

Heavy steering is better because you can feel the front wheels loading up well before they lose grip, and you can drive the car harder with confidence. If the back steps out which our VT will do on the limit in slower bends, heavy steering with good road feel enables easy correction of any slides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Anyone else able to report getting the flash done?
 

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Manufacturers redesign parts for different markets all of the time; more often because of different legislative requirements but also for driving preferences. Changing the steering geometry is an easy thing to do (two parts: left and right steering links). Less Ackermann (racing cars have no Ackermann) means better bite but greater steering wheel kickback, so it's changing the degree of compromise. As far as steering racks goes, I was in a workshop a few years ago with a Veloster turbo disguised as a NA with three different steering controllers (flashed with different levels of assistance) and two different steering racks that they were trying back-to-back. By that stage it had different rear dampers to the European model, and a different rear axle assembly to the European model with more negative camber for less oversteer. Again these are minor modifications: dampers are produced by Sachs for whatever specification Hyundai order, while the changed camber comes from the two trailing arms (left and right).

I joked with Neil that Hyundai wouldn't let him have what he wanted because I thought Hyundai wouldn't let him go that far. At the time I was so convinced that I didn't consider buying a Veloster turbo until I read some road reports that were very, very complimentary to the steering and handling. One rated the car as the best handling front wheel drive they had ever driven. But I still wasn't convinced, until I took a demonstrator on a lengthy drive on a rough, winding road and then I was convinced. I got into the car, I drove it hard and it responded beautifully with great feedback, although the salesman in the passenger seat was rigid with fear. I bought that demonstrator.

Hyundai Australia later publicised the Veloster turbo with Australian input and mentioned the dampers, the rear axle and the steering changes. I believe our steering rack ended up being variable ratio.
 

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2019 R-Spec with 7k miles on it. Love the car but am frustrated with the lack of steering feedback. Have had it aligned and it's reported that alignment is to factory specs. Driving straight is a chore and the car wanders and requires constant steering correction to stay on a straight line. Pushing tire pressures up near 38-40 improves it only slightly. Driving with winter 16" Michelin snow tires have same problem. Dealer, of course, claims all is normal. Driving any length of time is tiring.
Any suggestion on what to do next?
Has Hyundai changed the steering system at all for 2020 or 2021 models?
 

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Need proper alignment.
 
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