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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My parents have this habit of warming up the car for around 5-10 minutes during the winter season.
I kind of understand this is necessary for older cars but what about my VT?
I'll be heading to chicago so I was curious.
Is it necessary or just non sense?
 

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As far as I am concerned, turbos MUST be warmed up before driving.

This is also the reason I will never buy a used turbo car.
 

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Letting it warm up anymore than 10-20 seconds is a waste of gas. In fact the owners manual suggests that very thing. That being said, I wouldn't drive it hard till all the fluids are nice and toasty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Letting it warm up anymore than 10-20 seconds is a waste of gas. In fact the owners manual suggests that very thing. That being said, I wouldn't drive it hard till all the fluids are nice and toasty.
So would it be safe to assume 20 seconds is plenty of warm up time?
 

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I think the best thing would be to check your owners manual.......now that I think about it it may be 20 to 40 seconds.
 

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I think it says do not let the car idle for more than 3 minutes. Therefore, I drive it cold and carefully until it warms up which is funny cause its instantly warms up after a minute of driving.
 

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Just a note that the factory remote start will run the car for more than 3 minutes.
 

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I like to give any car a minute or so if it is really cold - well below freezing - to let the oil thin out. But in just normal cold 10-20 seconds is fine.

Also with any car I don't do anything but put it around in the cold until the motor reaches operating temperature before "spirited" driving.

Is anyone else noticing that we are getting in to horsepower weather?
 

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I think it says do not let the car idle for more than 3 minutes. Therefore, I drive it cold and carefully until it warms up which is funny cause its instantly warms up after a minute of driving.
"do not let it idle for more than 3 mins" while in the "were-not-going-to-call-it-a-break-in" period. After that you can idle as much as you want :)
 

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I noticed it when I took off like a rocket a few days ago, It felt like a EVo for a second, too bad I ran out of road.
I like to give any car a minute or so if it is really cold - well below freezing - to let the oil thin out. But in just normal cold 10-20 seconds is fine.

Also with any car I don't do anything but put it around in the cold until the motor reaches operating temperature before "spirited" driving.

Is anyone else noticing that we are getting in to horsepower weather?
 

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My parents have this habit of warming up the car for around 5-10 minutes during the winter season.
I kind of understand this is necessary for older cars but what about my VT?
I'll be heading to chicago so I was curious.
Is it necessary or just non sense?
It's been pretty cold here the last few weeks. I hop in, start the car, and the revs upon start sit at right around 1500. After about 20-30 seconds they drop to 1000. Once the drop I put it in gear and start driving. That's plenty of time for oil to get to to the top of the engine and lubricate everything, which is really the only thing you're really trying to do. I don't drive hard until my temp guage is at it's normal driving temperature. The only reason to warm the car up any longer is so that you're hopping in a toasty heated car. As far as caring for the engine goes 20-30 seconds is adequate.
 

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At -22F, your oil is very thick. In fact it could be considered "sludge". Your turbocharger has very small oil lines that keep it well lubricated and cooled for it to spin at 170,000 RPM when "boosting". The -22F oil in your engine needs to warm up and thin out to be able to pass through those tiny oil lines to keep bearings from getting damaged.
Now while it sounds great that people drive nice and easy while the engine temp is down but you have to keep in mind that your turbo spins up with very little throttle input. Also, it only takes one "Holy crap, I gotta merge into traffic fast!" pedal mashing to spin the turbo up to that 170,000 RPM and damage bearings. Now I'm not saying that we're talking catastrophic failure first time this "Holy crap!" moment happens but it is quite likely to have a cumulative effect on the life of the turbo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
At -22F, your oil is very thick. In fact it could be considered "sludge". Your turbocharger has very small oil lines that keep it well lubricated and cooled for it to spin at 170,000 RPM when "boosting". The -22F oil in your engine needs to warm up and thin out to be able to pass through those tiny oil lines to keep bearings from getting damaged.
Now while it sounds great that people drive nice and easy while the engine temp is down but you have to keep in mind that your turbo spins up with very little throttle input. Also, it only takes one "Holy crap, I gotta merge into traffic fast!" pedal mashing to spin the turbo up to that 170,000 RPM and damage bearings. Now I'm not saying that we're talking catastrophic failure first time this "Holy crap!" moment happens but it is quite likely to have a cumulative effect on the life of the turbo.
That was some great info, thanks
 

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-22° F !!!!!!! If you are encountering those temps I would assume you would use a block heater. For most "normal" winter temperatures( 0-15 °F at night) I will stick with a 20 sec. warm up.
 

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-22° F !!!!!!! If you are encountering those temps I would assume you would use a block heater. For most "normal" winter temperatures( 0-15 °F at night) I will stick with a 20 sec. warm up.
We get a month or two of those temps here. Block heaters do help keep the coolant & block warmer than ambient temperature but all the engine oil is laying in the bottom of the unheated oil pan.
 

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We get a month or two of those temps here. Block heaters do help keep the coolant & block warmer than ambient temperature but all the engine oil is laying in the bottom of the unheated oil pan.
Are you talking -22 C? You're in CAN so the Americans might get confused.

As for the idling people...from my days working in a dealership, the lot attendants/porters (whatever you like to call them) will idle the cars for as long as they want. Dead battery? Car idles for 3-4 hours. Moving cars around on the lot? Every car that needs to be moved gets turned on from the beginning, and is run until the job is complete (turn on all the cars, move the cars and make sure the line is straight, turn off all the cars). Depending how many cars need to be moved, the cars could be idling for 5 minutes to 1 hour. The moving doesn't help any thing as the speed never gets above 5mph for more than 10 seconds at a time. Idle speed when getting out of a spot or re-parking.

Just be glad your cars weren't on the lot for too long.
 

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I like to give any car a minute or so if it is really cold - well below freezing - to let the oil thin out. But in just normal cold 10-20 seconds is fine.

Also with any car I don't do anything but put it around in the cold until the motor reaches operating temperature before "spirited" driving.

Is anyone else noticing that we are getting in to horsepower weather?
Yes, my VT loved the cold dry air down here in FL compared to the hot and humid air.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I've heard from a few peeps I know in Chicago that it can reach -17.
That is why I am concerned.
 
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